A new study authored by several scientists from EcoHealth Alliance – the controversial organization collaborating on bat coronavirus research with the Wuhan Institute of Virology – including Peter Daszak is funded by Anthony Fauci’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

The publication of the study – “A Strategy to Assess Spillover Risk of Bat SARS-Related Coronaviruses in Southeast Asia” – follows intense scrutiny over Fauci’s National Institutes of Health (NIH) agency sending taxpayer dollars to fund the Daszak-led group’s “longtime collaboration” with the Wuhan Institute of Virology.

Both Daszak and Fauci have lied about the type of research occurring at the Chinese Communist Party-run lab, as a host of Fauci’s emails obtained via the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) reveal the facility was carrying out “gain-of-function” research and deleted articles reveal the lab worked with live bats despite Daszak stating otherwise.

Daszak, who failed to disclose his extensive ties to the Wuhan lab and the Chinese Communist Party, was also recused from the Lancet medical journal’s COVID-19 commission.

Despite this, Fauci’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is still funding EcoHealth Alliance, which has also taken massive, six-figure Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans.

The study, which is currently in preprint, counts six EcoHealth Alliance researchers as authors in addition to Lin-Fa Wang, who is also a longtime collaborator of the Wuhan lab and has been listed as an author on several Fauci-funded studies focusing on bat coronaviruses.

The study’s abstract posits that COVID-19 “likely” has a bat origin, summarizing its conclusion that bat SARS-related coronavirus infection happens “more frequent than previously recognized”:

Emerging diseases caused by coronaviruses of likely bat origin (e.g. SARS, MERS, SADS and COVID-19) have disrupted global health and economies for two decades. Evidence suggests that some bat SARS-related coronaviruses (SARSr-CoVs) could infect people directly, and that their spillover is more frequent than previously recognized. Each zoonotic spillover of a novel virus represents an opportunity for evolutionary adaptation and further spread; therefore, quantifying the extent of this “hidden” spillover may help target prevention programs.

“An average of 400,000 such infections occur each year, most going unrecognized because they cause mild or no symptoms and aren’t easily transmitted between people,” the study adds.

Bloomberg News interviewed Daszak about the study’s findings:

“This isn’t about finding viruses and saying ‘this country is a high risk to the rest of the world. This is about finding communities within countries that are at risk and trying to block them from getting infected, helping people in those communities reduce public health threats.”

September 21, 2021 6:49 pm

By admin

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